Fictional horrors to deal with the real ones (4 stars) Originally released in 1981, Danse Macabre is a non-fiction book in which Stephen King tells the history of horror literature through the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as present the main influences on his work. The book also brings a very interesting theory about…

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Leonardo da Vinci on acid (5 stars) Codex Seraphianus is one of my favorite books, but I have never read it. No one has, in fact, because this encyclopedia of a surreal world is written in an imaginary alphabet, with indecipherable texts. The book was first published in 1981, by Italian artist and architect Luigi…

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Good introduction to the world of Borges (4 stars) I have often heard the following phrase about Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges: “I wanted so much to read, but It’s too hard”. Most likely because of the encyclopedic erudition of his texts and his love for metaphysics, philosophy and mathematic; interests that bleeds into his…

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Space aliens meet Hollywood aliens (4 stars) The book introduces us to the benevolent and advanced Yherajk, aliens that picked up radio and television signals from Earth and have come to introduce themselves to humanity. The Yherajk are actually sentient colonies of unicellular organisms that look like walking green bubbles. It also doesn’t help their…

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Makes you feel lost like a child in a grown-ups world (5 stars) Originally published in 1865, Alice in Wonderland is considered the first children book. But it is hard to imagine a child could understand the intricate symbolic of this book, as well as it’s follow up Through the Looking-Glass. The narrative is full…

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Science fiction that may cease to be fiction (4 stars) Hard sci fi is all about predicting the route current science can take, so why not guide the fiction side by side with current research? That’s the idea behind Visions of the Future, a book that, as the tagline says, brings original fiction inspired by…

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Voodoo godlike AIs (4 stars) “Signature smell of the Sprawl, a rich amalgam of stale subway exhalations, ancient soot, and the carcinogenic tang of fresh plastics, all of it shot through with the carbon edge of illicit fossil fuels.” The follow up to Neuromancer, Count Zero is another cyberpunk classic that revisits many themes of…

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