A sad testament of the human ability to adapt (5 stars) “I am one; you are others; this is in the inevitable nature of things.” Originally from 1961, this book from anthropologist Theodora Kroeber – mother of science fiction writer Ursula K. Le Guin – tells the story of California’s last “wild” native: Ishi. He…

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Richard Adams used to make up stories about little bunnies for his daughters during long car rides in the English country. One day, infuriated at a lousy children’s book he bought, he considered: “I can do better than that”. The result is one of England’s most beloved young reader’s novels. The story of Watership Down,…

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The first sci fi book ever written! (5 stars) Published in 1818, Frankenstein is considered the first work o science fiction. It tells the story of one Victor Frankenstein, scientist that creates a living being out of dead body parts. THIS REVIEW CONTAINS MINOR SPOILERS The unnamed creature of the book – commonly called Frankenstein…

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Great premise, but barren plot and characters (3 stars) A sci fi classic, the Foundation series is set over thousands of years. In a distant future, humanity is spread all over the galaxy in an enormous empire that doesn’t even know it’s original planet anymore. Enter mathematician Hari Seldon, who develops a science called psychohistory….

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Cold War creeping into dying Colonialism (5 stars) It’s hard to grasp that Portugal had African colonies up to the 1970s, when pretty much the entire world had left the Colonial bandwagon and was more preoccupied with the Cold War. While the eyes of the world were on Vietnam, Portugal, one of the poorest countries…

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Lukewarm conclusion to a great series (3 stars) “There’s a whole new apocrypha out there, really – ghost ships, lost cities…There’s a pathos to it, when you think about it. I mean, every bit of it’s locked into orbit. All of it manmade, known, owned, mapped. Like watching myths take root in a parking lot.”…

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Seminal cyberpunk (5 stars) Written in 1984, Neuromancer is widely considered one of the seminal classics of cyberpunk, a sci fi subgenre that is pessimistic and dystopic, with themes like the fusion between body and cybernetic technology, corrupt corporations controlling society, hackers and antiheroes. Neuromancer was William Gibson’s first book and the first to get…

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Military sci fi that transcends the genre (5 stars) The two main military sci fi classics are Starship Troopers and Forever War. While the first is a World War II metaphor, with a somewhat ambiguous message about militarism and even the need of fascism in times of crisis, Joe Haldeman’s book exposes the madness of…

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